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lottereinigerforever:

Mike Nichols & Elaine May

lottereinigerforever:

Mike Nichols & Elaine May

This was posted 17 hours ago. It has 48 notes. .

Elaine May during postproduction on Mikey and Nicky:

"May seemed to enjoy the minutiae of editing (in its way, a visual analogue to improvisation), although at times her habits became erratic. Some nights she would return to the editing bays after the editors had gone home, with Cassavetes in tow, and systematically undo everything the editors had done that day, then disappear for forty-eight hours. Cassavetes, Falk, and the writer Peter Feibleman were among the chosen few allowed to visit. At some point during postproduction, Jeannie Berlin also moved into the Sunset Marquis. May herself rarely ventured out, save to troll from her suite to the cutting room, her figure wraith-like, her face occasionally painted with intense mask like makeup. She had forbidden the maids from entering her private bedroom for ten months, and when she left the remaining production staff found rotting banana peels and apple cores strewn in her bed, the charred remains of TV dinners in the oven, the blackout curtains across all the windows. She’d written notes to herself in lipstick across all the mirrors. May seemed to lived primarily on pills and health food. At one point she even commanded an underling to bring her only pink food. "If you put any salt in the food," May told one waitress, "I will die right here."

From Rachel Abramowitz’ Is That a Gun in Your Pocket?

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reimagined profile writing

reimagined profile writing

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"I regret ever believing that being ironic and counterintuitive were acceptable substitutes for having real thoughts. I also regret the serious problem I had with mimicry when I first started out. I’d write my versions of David Sedaris stories or Gawker posts and then wonder why so many of my pieces were being rejected. Of course, they were being rejected because they were transparent ripoffs, and I needed time to become my own writer (which is an ongoing process). To get hired at Gawker, I first had to stop trying to write like I belonged at Gawker.”

Cord Jefferson, writer

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